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Spring Meeting and Banquet Date Announced!

The Nebraska Fur Harvesters Association will have it’s Spring Meeting on April 21st, 2018 in Seward, Nebraska at the Seward VFW.

We are excited to announce that in addition to the meeting, new this year will be the NFH Spring Banquet, held in the evening after the meeting.  Proceeds from the banquet will be used to help build a defense fund, to be used in legally defending our rights as trappers and fur harvesters if the need shall ever arise.

Details for the banquet will be released as they come available. But there will be a guest speaker, awesome food (steak and sides), and a silent auction/raffle full of great stuff that you as a sportsman will find good use for.

Tickets will be $20, and there will only be 100 sold.  Purchase in advance from Eric Stane ericnfh@gmail.com, (402) 658-0812 or Mark Hajny  mhajny@gmail.com (402) 762-5762.

 

Nebraska Wildlife Regulations

The following link will take you to a document detailing the Nebraska Game and Parks Association wildlife regulations in their entirety.

This is an exhausting and detailed list of all the regulations pertaining to wildlife, including trapping and hunting, for the state of Nebraska.

Whereas the annual Hunting Guides will summarize this info (and make it easier for us non-lawyer types for us to read), this is the source from which the guides are produced.

Here is the link:  Nebraska Wildlife Regulations

This information is also available as a link under the Education menu.

Thank you to Dave Hastings for pinpointing this information for us.

Opening Day

It’s opening day for trapping most furbearers in Nebraska.  We at the Nebraska Fur Harvesters Association wish you a season filled with success, pride, enjoyment and education.  We also hope you end up making a little money on top of it, although with prices the way they are, do not set your expectations out of reach.

We would like to to keep the following things in mind this season as you set out to trap:

  • You are setting an example for all trappers, everywhere.  Be the trapper you would want kids to learn from.
  • Take someone with you who has never trapped before.  Show them a few sets, harvest a few animals and show them how it’s done.
  • Be humane.
  • Be respectful of landowner’s property and do not trespass.  Ask permission on private ground.
  • If trapping on public ground, please be aware of the fact that other people (and their dogs) will be using the property as well, and place your sets accordingly.
  • Work hard.
  • Don’t be afraid to release animals that look too small or do not look primed up.  There is no shame in releasing a sub-par animal.
  • Help another trapper/outdoorsman if he needs it.
  • Share advice with a beginner.  We were all there at one time.
  • Take time to learn something new.
  • Stop and take in all that the outdoors has to offer.
  • Obey all your state laws.

Thank you and have a good season!
-The Nebraska Fur Harvesters

Used Traps Needed For Youth

Once again at the Nebraska Fur Harvesters Convention, Mike Lance will be doing the youth trap toss.  This is a fun activity for kids of all ages.  Mike has been doing this for a lot of years and kids look forward to it every year.

But we need your help.

We need used traps for the giveaway.  Each kid comes away with a trap to take home.  If you are coming to the convention, please bring a 1 1/2 coil spring, dog proof, or 110 for donation to the youth trapping program.  If you are not coming, send one with someone who is.

If you are at the convention and see Mike, tell him thanks for all he does for Nebraska’s trapping future.

Thank you for your donations!

Trapper’s Education Class

We will be holding a trappers ed class Sunday September 10th, 2017, 9 am to 3 pm, at the Beatrice Gun Club in Beatrice, NE.  Click here for a google map and directions.

The morning will be classroom, regulations, equipment, ethics etc. and the afternoon will be outside doing demos.

There will be plenty of free raffle giveaways and lunch will be provided.

To register or ask questions please contact education coordinator Eric Stane at  (402) 658-8012.

Fur Harvest Surveys

It’s the time of year when the Nebraska Game and Parks sends out their annual Fur Harvest Survey.  It is also the time when we will remind you to fill these out and send them in.

The importance of these surveys can not be stressed enough.

Without numbers and hard facts, wildlife biologists are left to guesswork when making strategic decisions on your trapping and fur harvesting future.  We, the fur harvesters of Nebraska, will be providing the decision makers with the data they need to do their jobs and protect our interests.  It is also completely anonymous.

Free Postage. If there is one thing trappers can agree on, its that free is good.

One thing of high importance on these surveys is the question about river otters.  Nebraska is getting close to having a trapping season of some sort on river otters, but it will never happen unless biologists get hard facts on how many are around.

It takes about 5 minutes of your time, no one will know its you, and it won’t cost you anything for postage.

Let’s all do the responsible thing and send in our surveys!

 

The Urban Coyote – Coming To A Town Near You

If you follow wildlife in the news, you can’t escape the stories.   Cities in California are struggling trying to manage the problem of cohabitating with wild canines.  Coyotes spotted in the park, coyote grabs dog, coyote bites Hastings, Nebraska boy…wait…what?

In a recent story in The Hastings Tribune talks about a 1 year old boy being bitten by a coyote at a fireworks celebration in Hastings, Nebraska.  Shay Burke, writer for the Hastings Tribune writes:

 “According to the report, the family was lighting fireworks and the coyote came walking up the sidewalk from the south. The coyote allegedly bit the child then ran off to the east between some houses.

“The witnesses, the child’s family, said they are positive it was a small coyote,” Hessler said. “They have hunted them in the past and know what they look like. It was mangy looking, hair was falling out.”

Sgt. Brian Hessler with the Hastings Police Department confirmed Wednesday morning that there was a report filed of a coyote allegedly biting a child in the 500 block of South Boston Avenue about 10:30 p.m. Tuesday.

Coyotes aren’t the only wild canines that take up residence in our urban environments.  All too often, red fox get pushed out of their

Another common resident in our urban areas is the red fox.

natural habitat into town.  Once there, they find abundant food sources such as rabbits, stray cats and garbage.  Soon they take up permanent residence.  The sight of these creatures makes neighborly conversation and the cute and cuddly pups often earn offerings of table scraps and other food.  This is where urban wildlife problems begin.  This benevolency of citizens starts the wheels in motion for problem wildlife.  A situation that will not end well for the animal or the citizen.

I asked Dave Hastings for his opinion on the matter.  Dave is the editor of The Fur Taker Magazine, official magazine of the Fur Takers of America, and a long time fur harvester.  ” Well obviously we need to come to our senses and prioritize human and pet safety and health above wild predators. We are not “equal partners in the happy ship earth.” A coyote will eat a child in a heartbeat; not because the coyote is inherently evil, but because the coyote is a wild carnivore, and in his amoral eyes, meat is meat.”

When I asked Dave about what people need to understand about wildlife in urban areas, he had this to say:  “First, wildlife is beautiful, admirable, and morally important. But un-threatened populations become dangerous. Raccoons seem cute until a homeowner finds roundworm-infested scat everywhere. Disease, direct threats to people and pets, and ultimately the degenerated health of the animal populations themselves are the result of poor management. People die from this. Children are attacked. Beloved pets are killed and eaten. This is not Disney; this is real.”

For us fur harvesters, this opens up opportunities.  Check your plat maps and see who owns the cornfields at the edge of town.  Urban areas are usually the hunting grounds, not the residence, so they are coming from somewhere.  Check with your local authorities before taking any action against urban wildlife.  Above all, be a good example for trappers and hunters everywhere.  Practice common sense and obey all regulations.

-Mark Hajny
Nebraska Fur Harvesters Association